Notes from The Classroom Starter
U.C.B. - Sexy Lady
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kushingtonthechief:

Classic Gogo. I know you caught Don’t Disturb This Groove sample by The System, right?

Sexy lady, gimme your number, girl. Sexy lady, I wanna rock your world. 

Sexy Lady x UCB 

aguycalledkwest:

popchartlab:

Class is in session for our latest lesson on the essential elements of rap! This periodic table of hip-hop’s most tip-top assigns chemical symbols and notates genres, area of origin and debut years for 223 artists. It’s sure to be enjoyed far more than periodically.

(via TumbleOn)
aguycalledkwest:


Roots






(via TumbleOn)
aguycalledkwest:

zoop3r:

Common






(via TumbleOn)
aguycalledkwest:

(via TumbleOn)

kingjaffejoffer:

I just saw the commercial for “No Good Deed” and I’m blown away that they have a Black movie that’s not a romantic comedy or a period piece about slavery or the civil rights movement. 

I might go see that shit based on that alone. 

It actually looks decent. 

lostinurbanism:

Let The Church Say Amen, Brother Ceodtis Fulmore

lostinurbanism:

Let The Church Say Amen, Brother Ceodtis Fulmore

thekidshouldseethis:

The Nicholas Brothers in the greatest dance number ever filmed.
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

The Nicholas Brothers in the greatest dance number ever filmed.

Watch the video.

humansofnewyork:

"My father left for war in 1992, and never came home. Our mother didn’t tell us he was dead for a long time. We just thought he was still fighting. But one day we were being extremely difficult, and she started crying, and said: "Please behave. I’m a single mother now. So I’m going to need you’re help."(Juba, South Sudan)

humansofnewyork:

"My father left for war in 1992, and never came home. Our mother didn’t tell us he was dead for a long time. We just thought he was still fighting. But one day we were being extremely difficult, and she started crying, and said: "Please behave. I’m a single mother now. So I’m going to need you’re help."

(Juba, South Sudan)

The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to 2011 census data. The gap has worsened in the last decade, and the United States now has a greater wealth gap by race than South Africa did during apartheid. (Whites in America on average own almost 18 times as much as blacks; in South Africa in 1970, the ratio was about 15 times.)

Blue Ivy reacting to seeing herself on the screen during Beyonce’s VMA performance.

What worries you masters you.

As early as Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, in which he remarked on the dysfunction of the “pulmonary apparatus” of blacks, lungs were used as a marker of difference, a sign that black bodies were fit for the field and little else. (Forced labor was seen as a way to “vitalize the blood” of flawed black physiology. By this logic, slavery is what kept black bodies alive.)

The notion that people of color have a racially defined deficiency isn’t new. The 19th century practice of measuring skulls, and equating them with morality and intelligence, is perhaps the most infamous example. But race-based measurements still persist. Today, doctors examine our lungs using spirometers that are “race corrected.” Normal values for lung health are reduced for patients that doctors identify as black. Not only might this practice mask economic or environmental explanations for lower lung capacity, but the logic of innate, racial difference is built into things like disability estimates, pre-employment physicals, and clinical diagnoses that rely on the spirometer. Race has become a biologically distinct, scientifically valid category despite the unnatural and social process of its creation.

Hamza Shaban, How Racism Creeps into Medicine (via processedlives)